www.thegamer.com

Why God Of War Doesn't Have Any Camera Cuts

The upcoming God of War sequel is going to bring some big changes to the series, with perhaps the biggest of them being a lack of camera cuts.

Whenever your point of view changes from one scene to the next is a camera cut. In both movies and games, this often happens all the time, but take all of them away and you’ll definitely notice.

The latest God of War game is going to be a notable departure from the cinematic origins of the series, as it will be removing both camera cuts and quick time events.

The changes were revealed in Eurogamer’s interview with the game’s creative director, Corey Barlog. In it, he said the idea was to tell a more personal story by bringing the camera closer to Kratos’ shoulder and then fixing it to his view. Wherever Kratos looks is where the player will look.

"There's never going to be a situation where we cut away and show you what someone else is doing,” he said during the interview.

While camera cuts are a staple of the film industry, games don’t need them to still tell a compelling story, at least in Barlog’s eyes. He’d been looking for a project to try something like this in for some time, and while initially there was some pushback from the development team he believes they also wanted to try something a little different.

via Eurogamer

This may seem a little confusing for those who’ve seen the God of War trailer at E3 this year, but while the trailer shows cuts as a method of showing various parts of the game, in the game itself "you're never looking away."

"That doesn't necessarily mean that Kratos is always on-screen, there are things that motivate us to look away, but we're always returning and usually trying to frame Kratos so he's anchoring everything that you're looking at."

Eurogamer then brought up the question of what if the player isn’t looking at the correct thing during a critical moment? Barlog admitted that it’s a risk, but one that would have to be taken in order to achieve his creative vision.

The solution will likely be similar to Metal Gear Solid 3 and 4, where the player is often able to direct the camera at what they would prefer to be looking at rather than what is necessarily the most important object in view.

But there will be times when the game will "take control" and “nudge” the player in order to ensure they’re looking at important things.

“But it's always a nudge. You always give them a little bit of a sense of freedom, so that it does feel like you're experiencing all of this in real-time."

NEXT: WHAT YOU DIDN'T KNOW ABOUT KRATOS

Sakurai Is A Coward, So Fight Of The Gods Gives Us The Jesus-Versus-Santa Fighting Game We Wanted

More in News