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Shroud Thinks Battle Royale Is Too Luck-Based To Be Competitive

Anyone who has been paying attention to gaming for the past few years knows that battle royale is all the rage. Games like Fortnite, Apex Legends, and PUBG regularly dominate Twitch viewership, and millions of players log in to play on every conceivable platform. (We're also told people play Battlefield V Firestorm, but certain reports make us wonder.) Even if may gamers would spurn the genre as a passing fad, the fact that developers are ignoring single-player to work on battle royale says a lot.

One Twitch streamer, however, thinks battle royale games have to make some big changes in order to completely dominate gaming. The problem, he says, is that they rely too much on luck.

RELATED: Shroud’s Spot-On: Fortnite’s Constant Updates Make Players Expect Too Much From Other Games

Via: Nintendo.co.uk

During a recent stream, Michael "shroud" Grzesiek was discussing the potential of battle royales for esports with his viewers. While many high-profile tournaments have already happened, including the ongoing Fortnite World Cup, shroud believes the genre is too flawed to make for truly competitive gaming.

"What makes the game less interesting is the mid-game, because the mid-game everyone is hiding. Then the late game is a clusterf**k because everyone's been hiding the mid-game."

While his fans expressed their opinions in chat, shroud explained that he knows luck plays a crucial role in the beginnings of a battle royale match. He admitted that the process of dropping and finding the first bits of loot is up to luck, and that's a defining feature of the genre. His issue is with people playing keep away once they have their loot. This often leads to a slow mid-game, he says, and culminates in an overly-chaotic late game where all the survivors go wild because the circle forces them together.

"There needs to be something there... so that there isn't 40 people at the very end. Because then it's not a matter of skill, it's who the f**k gets the luckiest to win the game and it shouldn't be that," he goes on to say. "To determine a win for the whole match with luck? No, no."

His comments are just another of the many complaints and criticisms professional gamers have with battle royale games in esports. However, judging by Epic's stance when it comes to balancing Fortnite, it seems the views of these skilled few matter little when stacked against the needs of the many casuals. Don't expect to see shroud hired on as a consultant anytime soon.

(Source: Dexerto)

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