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EU Streamers Could Get Flagged For Having The Wrong Poster On Their Wall, Twitch CEO Worries

Twitch CEO Emmett Shear recently explained why the passing of Article 13 in Europe is about to make streaming even more of a headache than it already can be.

In a world in which anyone can switch on a camera and/or a microphone and share pretty much anything online, copyright law has naturally become pretty complicated. However, for those in the streaming community, particularly if you live in Europe, things might be about to get a whole lot worse. This is due to the introduction of Article 13.

Without getting too bogged down in all the details, Article 13 is basically bad news for streamers living in the EU. While the premise of it is sound, as it is just trying to protect content creators, its structure and the way in which it is being implemented means that the rules in place will be too strict for streaming services to carry on as we know them today. Take a look at the YouTube mockup below to see what we mean by this.

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Emmett Shear, the CEO of Twitch, recently shed a little more light on what Article 13 might mean for EU streamers on his very own platform. Shear explained that a poster in the background of a stream might be copyrighted and not deemed as fair use. It could even pick up on music playing in the background that might be considered copyright infringement, regardless of the music's source.

It seems crazy, but this is the reality streamers face. Streamers outside of the EU should take notice, too. If you have a lot of subscribers in Europe, then you might be affected by Article 13 as well. If your content is deemed to be breaking the new regulations, then your streams and channel could be banned from the continent.

There are obviously fairly strict copyright rules already in place when it comes to streaming platforms. However, in the past, the streamer has been the one liable for breaking copyright laws. Article 13 dictates that the streaming service, such as Twitch or YouTube, will be held responsible too. This means that rather than issues being handled in court, Article 13 will force the services to take videos and maybe even channels down immediately.

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